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Delaware Gazetteer ~ Town Listing N ~ Y

Delaware was first settled by the Dutch in 1629. In 1638 the Swedes made a settlement and held the colony until 1655, when it was surrendered to the Dutch. In 1661 this region, with the other Dutch possessions, was acquired by the Duke of York. In 1682 this territory passed from the Duke of York to William Penn by deed, and was held by him until 1701, when he granted it a charter enabling its people to set up a separate government. Delaware is one of the thirteen original States, and was the first to adopt the Constitution, taking this step December 7, 1787.

N O P R S T U V W Y

Nanticoke; river, rises in Sussex County and runs southwestward into Maryland, where it forms the boundary between the counties of Dorchester and Wicomico, and enters Chesapeake Bay at the western extremity of the latter county. Length, 75 miles.

Nassau; post village in Sussex County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Newark; town in Newcastle County on the Baltimore and Ohio and the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington railroads. Population, 1,213.

Newcastle; city in Newcastle County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad, situated on the Delaware River. Population, 3,380.

Newcastle; County, the most northern of the State, bordering on Pennsylvania. It is bounded on the east by Delaware River and Bay and is drained by Brandywine, Christiana, Red Clay, and Duck creeks. The surface is undulating; the soil is fertile. Area, 434 square miles. Population, 109,697; white, 93,454; Negro, 16,197; foreign born, 12,916. County seat, Wilmington. The mean magnetic declination in 1900 was 6° 05'; the mean annual rainfall, 45 inches; and the temperature, 50° 00'. The county is traversed by the Baltimore and Ohio, the Philadelphia and Reading, and the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington railroads.

Newport; town in Newcastle County on Christiana Creek and on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Northwest; branch of Smyrna River in Newcastle County.

Noxontown; pond on headwaters of Appoquinimink Creek in Newcastle County.

O

Oakel; village in Sussex County.

Oakgrove; post village in Sussex County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Oakley; post village in Sussex County on the Queen Anne's Railroad.

Oceanview; post village in Sussex County near the ocean.

Odessa; town in Newcastle County on Appoquinimink Creek.

Omar; post village in Sussex County.

Overbrook; post village in Sussex County on the Queen Anne's Railroad.

Owens; post village in Sussex County on the Queen Anne's Railroad.

P

Pearson; village in Kent County.

Pepper; small creek emptying into Indian Bay in Sussex County.

Pepper; village in Sussex County.

Petersburg; village in Kent County.

Porter; post village in Newcastle County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Port Mahon; landing on shore of Delaware Bay in Kent County.

Port Penn; town in Newcastle County. Population, 304.

Price Corners; village in Newcastle County.

Prime Hook; creek, rising in Sussex County and emptying into Delaware Bay.

Providence; creek, a branch of Smyrna River in Newcastle County.

Puncheon; branch of St. Jones Creek in Kent County.

R

Ralph; post village in Sussex County.

Redden; post village in Sussex County on Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Red Lion; creek, a very small right-hand branch of Delaware River in Newcastle County.

Red Lion; post village in Newcastle County.

Reedy; island at head of Delaware Bay.

Rehoboth; bay, on the coast about 10 miles south of Cape Henlopen, separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a narrow peninsula. It connects on the south with Indian River Bay.

Rehoboth; town in Sussex County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington and the Queen Anne's railroads. Population, 198.

Reybold; station in Newcastle County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.
Rising-sun; village in Kent County.

Robbins; post village in Sussex County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Robinsonville; post village in Sussex County.

Rockland; post village in Newcastle County on Brandywine Creek.

Roxana; post village in. Sussex County.

S

St. Georges; town in Newcastle County. Population, 325.

St. Johns Branch; river, one of the small head branches of Nanticoke River.

St. Jones; creek, a small right-hand tributary to Delaware Bay in Kent County.

Sandtown; village in Kent County.

Sandy; point in Kent County projecting into Delaware Bay.

Scotts; village in Sussex County.

Seaford; town in Sussex County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad. Population, 1,724.

Selbyville; post village in Sussex County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Seven Hickories; village in Kent County.

Sewell; branch of Chester River in Kent County.

Sheals Branch; small head branch of Indian River, rising in Sussex County.

Shortly; village in Sussex County.

Shorts; landing on Smyrna River on boundary between Newcastle and Kent counties.

Slaughter; village in Kent County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Silver Run; small stream in Newcastle county tributary to Delaware Bay.

Smith; post village in Sussex County.

Smyrna; river, tributary to Delaware Bay on boundary between Newcastle and Kent counties.

Smyrna; town in Kent County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad. Population, 2,168.

Southwood; station in Newcastle County on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

Spring; creek, a tributary to Delaware Bay in Kent County.

Stanton; post village in Newcastle County, near Christiana Creek, on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and AVashington and the Baltimore and Ohio railroads.

Stateroad; post village in Newcastle County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Stockley; post village in Sussex County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.
Summit Bridge; post village in Newcastle County on the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal.

Sussex; southernmost county, bordering on Maryland. It is bounded on the east by Delaware Bay and the Atlantic Ocean, and is drained by Nanticoke and Indian rivers and by Mispillion and other creeks. The surface is nearly level, and a large part of it is covered with forests. The soil is mostly fertile; area, 911 square miles. Population, 42,276; white, 35,504; Negro, 6,762; foreign born, 268. County seat, Georgetown. The mean magnetic declination in 1900 was 5° 45; the mean annual rainfall, 45 inches; and the temperature 50°. The county is traversed by the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington and the Queen Anne's railroads.

Sycamore; post village in Sussex County.

T

Talleyville; post village in Newcastle County.

Tanners Branch; river, a small left-hand tributary to Choptank River, rising in Kent County.

Taylors Bridge; post village in Newcastle County.

Thomas Corners; village in Newcastle County.

Thompson; post village in Newcastle County on the Pennsylvania Railroad.

Thompsonville; village in Kent County.

Thoroughfare; neck of land lying between Cedar Swamp and Smyrna River in Newcastle County.

Tidbury; creek, a branch of St. Jones Creek in Kent County.

Townsend; town in Newcastle County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad. Population, 399.

Trinity; post village in Sussex County.

U

Union; village in Newcastle County.

V

Vance; neck of land lying between Silver River and Drawyer Creek in Newcastle County.

Vandyke; village in Newcastle County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Viola; post village in Kent County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

W

Walker; village in Newcastle County.

Waples; post village in Sussex County.

Ward; village in Sussex County.

Warwick; post village in Sussex County.

Westville; village in Kent County.

Whitesboro; post village in Sussex County on the Queen Anne's Railroad.

Whitesville; post village in Sussex County.

Wildcat; branch, a tributary to Choptank River in Kent County.

Williamsville; post village in Sussex County.

Willowgrove; village in Kent County.

Wilmington; city and county seat of Newcastle County. Population, 76,508. It is the port of entry, situated on the Delaware River and on the Brandywine and Christiana creeks which unite one-half mile from the river. It is on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, the Philadelphia and Reading, and the Baltimore and Ohio railroads.

Winterthur; post village in Newcastle County on the Philadelphia and Reading Railway.

Wooddale; post village in Newcastle County on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

Woodland; post village in Sussex County.

Woodside; post village in Kent County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Wyoming; town in Kent County on the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad. Population, 450.

Y

Yorklyn; post village in Newcastle County on the Baltimore and Ohio.

N O P R S T U V W Y

Gazetteer A ~ M | Delaware AHGP

Source: Gazetteer of Delaware, Department of the Interior, US Geological Survey, Bulletin #230, Series F, Geography 38, Government Printing Office, 1904.

 
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